Gregory Nobles, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus

Member Of:
  • School of History and Sociology
Related Links:
Overview

Dr. Gregory Nobles, Professor Emeritus of history, came to Georgia Tech as an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Sciences in 1983, and he spent 33 years at Georgia Tech as a specialist in early American history and environmental history.  In addition to teaching, he also served in three administrative positions, as Associate Dean of the Ivan Allen College (1994-1996), Chair of the School of History, Technology, and Society (1996-2001), and Founding Director of the Georgia Tech Honors Program (2005-2014).   He held two Fulbright professorships, as Senior Scholar in New Zealand (1995) and as the John Adams Chair in American History in The Netherlands (2002), and has received numerous research grants, including three from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and residential fellowships at the Charles Warren Center at Harvard University, the American Antiquarian Society, the Huntington Library, the Princeton University Library, and Newberry Library. In 2004 he was named to the Distinguished Lectureship Program of the Organization of American Historians and, for 2005-2008, was elected to the Advisory Council of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic (SHEAR); more recently, he has also served SHEAR as a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of the Early Republic and as a member of the SHEAR Book Prize committee. In his first year of retirement from Georgia Tech, 2016-2017, Nobles was the Mellon Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the American Antiquarian Society, and fifth book, John James Audubon: The Nature of the American Woodsman, was published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in March 2017. In 2018-2019, he will be the Robert C. Ritchie Distinguished Scholar in Residence at the Huntington Library in San Marino, California.

Education:
  • PhD, University of Michigan
  • AB, Princeton University
Areas of
Expertise:
  • American Revolution
  • Early American History
  • Environmental History