SST Research Center

Basketball SmallFootball HelmetPole VaultMcAshan

The Sports, Society, and Technology (SST) Research Center is an arm of the SST Program which also seek to create interest and increased visibility for the interdisciplinary study of sport at the Georgia Institute of Technology. The Research Center sponsors research-oriented workshops and additionally supports and promotes Georgia Tech faculty research findings related to sports.

Research Center Sponsored Events

The SST Research Center was proud to sponsor several important events.
 
Panel: “The 1996 Atlanta Olympics: Assessing Multiple Legacies”
SST hosted a panel on April 22, 2016 at Georgia Tech in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Atlanta Olympic Games. This panel featured scholars discussing the social, political, economic and infrastructural impact and legacy of the 1996 Olympic Games on Atlanta. Participants included Mary McDonald (moderator), Michael Dobbins (Georgia Tech School of City and Regional Planning), Christopher Le Dantec and Kate Diedrick (Georgia Tech, School of Literature, Media and Communication) and Maurice Dobson (Georgia State, Department of History). This panel was held in conjunction with the HSOC Metropolitan Inequalities Conference.
 
2016 North American Society for Sport History Conference
The SST Research Center, HSOC, and IAC hosted the 2016 North American Society for Sport History Conference at the Georgia Tech Conference Center and Hotel, May 27-30. This scholarly conference brought together over 200 sport historians to discuss relevant historical themes and scholarship. More information about the conference can be found at: http://pwp.gatech.edu/sst/
 
"Doing Sports History in the Digital Present" Pre-Conference
IAC, HSOC, the SST Research Center and the North American Society for Sport History hosted a pre-conference workshop May 25-26, 2016, “Doing Sports History in the Digital Present.” This workshop was free and open to the public. The goal of this workshop was to generate and extend conversations about digital scholarship, especially in relationship to the historical study of sport and related realms including recreation, games, physical activity, and the moving body. “Doing Sport History” featured 15 participants from North America and Australia, and was organized by Mary McDonald and Jennifer Sterling of Georgia Tech’s SST program. Murray Phillips, University of Queensland and editor of the Journal of Sport History also assisted in organizing the workshop. More information can be found at: http://pwp.gatech.edu/sst/
 
Fourteen articles from this workshop were published as part of a 2017 special issue in the Journal of Sport History in 2017. Each article in the special issue can be accessed at: http://www.journalofsporthistory.org/current-issue.html
 
"Innovations in Sport for Development Research" Workshop
IAC, HSOC and the SST Research Center hosted a post-conference workshop May 31-June 1, 2016, “Innovations in Sport for Development Research” featuring 10 scholars from North America, Europe, New Zealand and Australia discussing and critiquing sport for development scholarship. This workshop was free and open to the public. We were fortunate to have scholars from around the world participate from Atlanta and also via telecommuting capabilities from such global locations as New Zealand, Canada, Argentina, and England. Mary McDonald organized this conference with colleagues from the US and Canada. Papers from this event will be published in 2017 in Third World Thematics. More information about this workshop can be found at: http://pwp.gatech.edu/sst/
 
Exhibit Marks Anniversary of Historic Holmes v. Atlanta Court Case
In November of 2015, Dr. Mary McDonald and several Georgia Tech graduate students organized an exhibit displayed at the clubhouse of the Bobby Jones Golf Course in Atlanta celebrating the 60th Anniversary of the historic court case that facilitated the desegregation of public recreation facilities across the country. The exhibit, funded by the Friends of the Bobby Jones Golf Course, is called "Changing the Game" and commemorates the efforts of Alfred "Tup" Holmes, an African American golfer who challenged how access to public golf courses in 1950s Atlanta was strictly divided along racial lines. Featuring stories, photographs, and other artifacts documenting Holmes' historic Supreme Court case, the exhibit seeks to draw attention to the role of Atlanta's sport culture in the desegregation movement while preserving the history of the Bobby Jones course.
 
 
 
·